AYK

Just Have Fun.

streets-alive:

soundbitecity:

Food Trams:

When cities upgrade their tram and subway fleets from time to time, what happens to the old models that get removed from service? There’s only so much space in a transit museum, so what about putting them to use for other purposes?

The Watermael-Boitsfort section of Brussels is now home to a tram car that has been converted for street food use. It features a kitchen, a take away window, a small seating section inside, and some outdoor tables. Items for sale include burgers, sandwiches, fries, salads, fried snacks, drinks, and more.

I’m not sure how this one came to be, but cities all over should take note and think about related program ideas. It creates a destination other than the scrap yard for old trams while also providing low cost facilities and structures to food entrepreneurs.

Step aside food trucks, it’s time for food trams!

(Unfortunately, despite being on tracks, it appears to be stuck in place. Maybe the next one will be mobile.)

Related Post:

Tram Restaurant in Prague

Food + Transit = Food Tram

(via thisbigcity)

unconsumption:


Meet Kabira Stokes, the founder of Isidore Electronics Recycling – a startup that employs people with criminal records to recycle electronic waste in Los Angeles for companies seeking a more responsible way to manage their environmental footprint, and avoid exporting e-waste to developing countries that have poor environmental and workplace safety standards.
In the United States, it’s estimated that 50-80% of the e-waste collected for recycling is being exported (predominately to Asia). And only 25% of total e-waste is being collected for recycling – most is discarded in landfills or incinerators, releasing dangerous toxins into the land and air. While e-waste represents just two percent of America’s trash in landfills, it equals 70% of overall toxic waste.
So how did Isidore Electronics Recycling come to be?

The story here: How E-Waste Is Creating Jobs For People With Criminal Records In Los Angeles - Forbes

unconsumption:

Meet Kabira Stokes, the founder of Isidore Electronics Recycling – a startup that employs people with criminal records to recycle electronic waste in Los Angeles for companies seeking a more responsible way to manage their environmental footprint, and avoid exporting e-waste to developing countries that have poor environmental and workplace safety standards.

In the United States, it’s estimated that 50-80% of the e-waste collected for recycling is being exported (predominately to Asia). And only 25% of total e-waste is being collected for recycling – most is discarded in landfills or incinerators, releasing dangerous toxins into the land and air. While e-waste represents just two percent of America’s trash in landfills, it equals 70% of overall toxic waste.

So how did Isidore Electronics Recycling come to be?

The story here: How E-Waste Is Creating Jobs For People With Criminal Records In Los Angeles - Forbes

cjwho:

full-scale model hot-rod powered by air and LEGO

melbourne-based entrepreneur steve sammartino and 20 year old romanian technology genius raul oaida have built a hot-rod made entirely of LEGO, which is powered exclusively with air. the project, entitled the ‘super awesome micro project’ features an engine constructed from standard LEGO pieces, comprising of four orbital motors and a total of 256 pistons. the full scale model car was put together with more than half a million LEGO bricks, and can travel up to 30 km/h (without exploding).

watch the video below:

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goingurban:

In Sydney and Melbourne, Bookworld set up a bunch of shelves at bus stops and filled them with books to share with the community.
Watch to find out the public’s reaction! 

(via thisbigcity)